Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
DustinVoss

Vets come in, help the rookies

Recommended Posts

I'm 12 years deep in my career which means that I've worked the great recession, the expansion that followed, and the austerity imposed by pension mistakes of the past and pension hawks in the present. On top of all this, demographics have been shifting. There are less school-age children overall and specifically fewer in my "target demographic" here in Chicago.

I'd like to hear from some vets with 20, 30, 40 years how you think about getting the work when it is available. Certain years, I've been able to stack almost 20gs on top of my salary teaching Saturday and evening school, homebound, incentive/club/sports programs, paid pd, etc. This year its getting a bit better for for the past 3 years most of those opportunities have dried up, and I've stacked less than 5g on top of my salary with extras.

I know some of you advocate moving to where the money's good... but some of us are deeply tied to our communities or families and the cost of moving away is not worth anything we might be paid.

So I'm curious from the vets. How do you think about extra opportunities? Certainly I worked like an insane person in my 20s and I sacrificed a lot (no vacations, missing overseas trips with my friends, sacrificing some meaningful relationships) but it is that sacrifice that has me living the relatively comfortable life now, on track to retire a multi-millionaire. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, DustinVoss said:

I'm 12 years deep in my career which means that I've worked the great recession, the expansion that followed, and the austerity imposed by pension mistakes of the past and pension hawks in the present. On top of all this, demographics have been shifting. There are less school-age children overall and specifically fewer in my "target demographic" here in Chicago.

I'd like to hear from some vets with 20, 30, 40 years how you think about getting the work when it is available. Certain years, I've been able to stack almost 20gs on top of my salary teaching Saturday and evening school, homebound, incentive/club/sports programs, paid pd, etc. This year its getting a bit better for for the past 3 years most of those opportunities have dried up, and I've stacked less than 5g on top of my salary with extras.

I know some of you advocate moving to where the money's good... but some of us are deeply tied to our communities or families and the cost of moving away is not worth anything we might be paid.

So I'm curious from the vets. How do you think about extra opportunities? Certainly I worked like an insane person in my 20s and I sacrificed a lot (no vacations, missing overseas trips with my friends, sacrificing some meaningful relationships) but it is that sacrifice that has me living the relatively comfortable life now, on track to retire a multi-millionaire. 

1. Take approved for credit/salary point workshops to increase your salary to the top of the scale.

2. Get your admin credential. It widens your opportunities for out of the classroom positions. I got it not to be a principal, but two out of the classroom positions. Technology coach and Title 1 coordinator, which increased my salary. It took me one year to get my admin credential assuming you already have a masters degree. 

3. Look around for different blogs that offer opportunities for side gigs to replace those opportunities that have dried up. There are thousands and thousands of blogs. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also taught on Saturdays and evenings at UCLA extensions educational technology for teachers seeking their credentials.  

I just did a Googled on side gigs for teachers and came up with the list below. Perhaps somebody else would offer addtional ideas.  

 

5 hours ago, DustinVoss said:

Thanks Steve!

All over #1 and #2 already and I support these claims.

Regarding #3, care to post example?

Apr 19, 2018 - 33 Legit Ways Teachers Can Make Extra Money. Sell your lesson plans. Teacher Pay Teachers has changed the way teachers get and share content. Try tutoring online or in-person. Write an eBook. 4. Make money by flipping furniture. Sell your stuff. Buy and sell designers brands. Become a picker. Drive for Uber or Lyft.
 
Dec 4, 2017 - Here are the best ways for teachers and educators to make extra money ... have time to spare, babysitting would be a good side gig to consider.
 
Aug 24, 2018 - If you're looking to earn more money this summer, here are the perfect opportunities for you. Tutor. You're already great at educating. Camp Counselor. One job that is always in fashion in the summer is the role of camp counselor. Tour Guide. Freelance Writer. Babysitter. Online Teacher. Brand Ambassador.
 
Jan 31, 2018 - It's not only a clever way to earn some side cash, it's a time-saver (and ... online is a fun way for teachers to earn extra money while doing what they do best, .... those looking to make some extra income around their day jobs.
 
Mar 13, 2018 - After seeing countless people asking what kinds of side jobs are for teachers, I decided to compile a list that would allow you to work part-time ...
 
Oct 20, 2015 - Let's take a look at some of the best approaches out there. (Note: We've chosen to focus on jobs that will directly call on your skills as a teacher, ...
 
May 3, 2018 - These are the best online side hustles for teachers and anyone who: ... This gig is flexible, makes a decent income, and impacts lives across ...
 
Oct 23, 2018 - For many educators, a side hustle is a must because many areas don't pay ... The best part is that you can often get paid in cash or turn it into ... it all depends on your writing ability, skills, and the gigs you're able to secure.
What if a job for supplemental income actually led to better lessons, free meals ... Today, Education World shares a variety of side gigs that are just perfect for the ...
 
Any opportunities with you admin credential? 
My story of how I got my tech coaching position. I gave one of my many 3 minute public talks to the Board of Education over the 403(b) plan. This one time my future boss was in the audience and heard my talk and he offered me the tech coaching position in the hall right after the talk! I interviewed with him several times before but never offered me the job. He said that I now understood the bureaucratic "system". My talk was about the 403(b) and he was right that I really understood the system, but had nothing to do with educational technology! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually got "invited to submit a resume and interview" for a position with the district that was opening up. The strong indication was that if I wanted the job, it was mine. I would have been over the district's Civics curriculum responsible for revisions and providing professional development. In considering everything, I turned it down. The biggest reason is that I'm deeply committed to the school I teach and the specific community I serve, but the fact that very few people stick in central office gigs and that I would be giving up summers (where I make as much as $80/hr+tips driving boats) 

 

Thanks again steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, DustinVoss said:

Actually got "invited to submit a resume and interview" for a position with the district that was opening up. The strong indication was that if I wanted the job, it was mine. I would have been over the district's Civics curriculum responsible for revisions and providing professional development. In considering everything, I turned it down. The biggest reason is that I'm deeply committed to the school I teach and the specific community I serve, but the fact that very few people stick in central office gigs and that I would be giving up summers (where I make as much as $80/hr+tips driving boats) 

 

Thanks again steve

1

Hey Dustin!!! What is your problem! :- ) LOLs!

Making $80.00 an hour and TIPS driving boats as a summer job! Wow!!!! That's great. 

Seriously, for me, I was at one school for 14 years (out of the four different schools I taught plus UCLA extension), and I needed a change. I was the computer lab teacher and classroom teacher. It was very refreshing to me to have an outside the classroom position for a few years and then go back into the classroom, made me a better teacher.

But we all know teachers who have taught the same grade, same subject, same classroom, same school for 30-40 years and still are passionate and enthusiastic. THAT'S NOT ME! I love change, and I get passionate and excited about change, because I got out of my comfort level and met new teachers, new principals, new schools. That's exciting for me, but I know it isn't for everybody, most people do not like change. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×