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chicago12albright

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  1. In regards to using two different fund families. I like to stagger my investments so in one fund through Vanguard I'm more conservate because I plan to tap that fund within 10 to 15 years. The second fund through Fidelity I am more aggressive because I won't tap that fund for 20 years God willing. Just another way to look at retirement investing. Chicago
  2. Steve, I couldn't agree with you more. I've learned my lesson also. Its a losers game trying to chase after short term gains. If you do luck out you will probably lose it on the next sure thing. Chicago
  3. Just read in today's Chicago Tribune: "Your chances of putting your cash with an above-average manager might be better than 50-50 if you invest for three months, six months or one year, said Srikant Dash, index strategist at S&P. But once you extend the time period to three and five years or more, a majority of active funds underperform indexes." Chicago
  4. Thanks for the info. I just called Vanguard, and the man I spoke to told me he wouldn't be able to look that up very easily and I should just contact my human resources department. Not much help there, unfortunately. If you can not get the info easily from human resources I woulod try again. Some reps I find are more helpful than others. Good luck. Chicago
  5. I just typed my response and lost it so here goes again. My experience with Valic was bad. There are several items one including you have to stay with them for 15 years to transfer $ to another company without incurring a penalty. Not good! As for CPS call the fund (Vanguard etc.) directly and asee if they have accounts set up thru CPS. If they do its an easy process. Thats what I did because my employers list of vendors was not accurate. Hope that may help. Chicago
  6. Ira, APteacher, Great points! Index funds beat the majority of managed funds. It would be very difficult to impossible for a fund manager to beat an index fund year after year. Chicago
  7. APteacher Good point, "own individual circumstances." Each person determines their own risk tollerance and their own goals. Chicago
  8. Diversification among your stock portion also spreads the risk (foreign, Reit's, small, mid, large) A 50% split sounds more like a split while in retirement when you want to protect your nest egg. Prior to I am of the opinion that you need to take some calculated risk which may look different for each person. I have nine years until retiremnt but I'm comfortable with just 20 or 30% in bonds and fixed income. My stock portion is diversified among the assest classes I previously mentioned. It all boils down to risk tollerance. Peace! Chicago
  9. I agree with apteacher. However one more point. I was in the same position a month ago. I wanted to switch to one of these companies from a high fee fund. What I found out was that my employers list of vendors was incorrect. There had been account #'s set up for Vanguard and Fidelity that were not listed. The folks in those funds had been retired for several years so they didn't list them. I called up both fund families got our account # for the district and was able to enroll and not go through the hassle of getting a fund family approved. Hope this helps. Chicago Thanks for your input Chicago and apteacher. I asked the superintendent and she said we were not set up with any other vendors. She has been at my school for over 30 years, so she is probably right. I teach at a country school where we only have a few teachers. For us to get any other options, I know it will be up to me. Thanks, Phil I didn't ask our Supt. I called Vanguard and asked if my district had an account. What do you know we did and no one at our district was aware of it. It wasn't even on the list of vendors I requested. Once I got the account # there was no problem setting mine up. Its worth a try. I won't depend on the Supt. memory. 30 years is a long time. Best of luck. Chicago
  10. Good food for thought. I think that's a good way to look at it. I guess I'm looking at it differently. I figure my teacher's pension and SS will take care of my needs so why not be a little more of a risk taker with my 403B money. AP are you close to retirement having a 50/50 split? Has your alocation changed much over the years? Just curious. Chicago
  11. I certainly think one can take greater risk if you have a defined pension plan, but within reason. 100% invested in the market is foolish unless you are prepared to lose a chunk of it. I am nine years from retirement and I have a 20 bond 80 diversified stock portfolio which I think is being agressive within reason. As I get closer to when I will need the $ I will rebalance to become more conservative and that may not be at retirement but when I need the $. Chicago
  12. I agree with apteacher. However one more point. I was in the same position a month ago. I wanted to switch to one of these companies from a high fee fund. What I found out was that my employers list of vendors was incorrect. There had been account #'s set up for Vanguard and Fidelity that were not listed. The folks in those funds had been retired for several years so they didn't list them. I called up both fund families got our account # for the district and was able to enroll and not go through the hassle of getting a fund family approved. Hope this helps. Chicago
  13. That was my thought also about leaving some $ with Valic. The reason I would leave it with Valic is that I don't have the option of Fidelity, T. Rowe or any other low cost provider. I don't like having all my eggs in one basket. With that in mind maybe it would be ok to leave it with Valic.
  14. Recently I was able to set up a 403B with Vanguard. However I currently have two other accounts, one with Valic and the other with the Equitable. I don't have surrender charges with the EQ. so I'm planning to transfer all assets from there into Vanguard. With Valic there is a 5 or 6% surrender charge. The amount I have there is a lesser amount of money. I can eat the charge, wait another two years for no charge or just leave the money in there. Has anyone seen an upside of just leaving money alone in a fund like Valic? If I left it in Valic I would have several options to how I could receive it in retirement. With vanguard which I plan on having 80% to 90% of my annuity money it would function more like a bank account whereas Valic I could draw an income for life. Best of both worlds or am I not thinking clearly? Anyone in a similar situation? Any and all thoughts appreciated. Chicago I forgot to add that I only have a nine year window before I could start receiving benefits. Chicago
  15. 8% sounds good to me. Investments will go up and down the only thing you really have control over is fees. If fees are too high you can hopefully get into a fund with lower fees. Higher fees do not translate into a better manager or product. Just think you could be getting 8% and then slap on a 3% fee and now your getting 5%. Be happy with 8%. Chicago
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