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Advice Needed..nys Ing Vs Fidelity Vs Vanguard

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He's baaaaaaack. And as usual, he has contempt for anybody other than self-styled experts who may know something about investing. Just leave eeeeeeverything to those sales advisors, and they will take care of us.

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Guest TR1982

He's baaaaaaack. And as usual, he has contempt for anybody other than self-styled experts who may know something about investing. Just leave eeeeeeverything to those sales advisors, and they will take care of us.

 

 

OK. You're an expert too.

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dreyes 111,

 

Welcome to the board. I feel that the discussions would be more complete, if you restricted you post to one thread, instead of copying to various threads..

 

I disagree with TR when he posted, "That fella is wasting his time." when he made reference to you. You will find out that many who posts here, are not naive investors, but are in fact knowledgeable investors who have the best interest of the average 403b participant, and will respond to the inaccuracies that you post, and probably have been telling your financially uneducated clients.

 

Your comments about investing will be refuted when inaccurate, so potential 403b clients will be educated.

 

I for one welcome and look forward to your posts. You are definately not "wasting your time".

 

Thank you very much.

 

 

P.S. T.R and the others who Steve mentioned are advocates for the "SALES" agent, but please notice the derth of their posts. They were not able to compete in an open forum of educated people who have the best interest of the 403b participant.

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He's baaaaaaack. And as usual, he has contempt for anybody other than self-styled experts who may know something about investing. Just leave eeeeeeverything to those sales advisors, and they will take care of us.

 

 

OK. You're an expert too.

 

But TR, I'm not NEARLY the expert that dreyes111 is. He guarantees that he can beat any mutual fund in existence with his innovative money management system and a simple fixed annuity. He is an absolute miracle worker. That silly old rule about risk and return has just vanished.

 

Can you top that, TR?

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Guest TR1982

dreyes 111,

 

Welcome to the board. I feel that the discussions would be more complete, if you restricted you post to one thread, instead of copying to various threads..

 

I disagree with TR when he posted, "That fella is wasting his time." when he made reference to you. You will find out that many who posts here, are not naive investors, but are in fact knowledgeable investors who have the best interest of the average 403b participant, and will respond to the inaccuracies that you post, and probably have been telling your financially uneducated clients.

 

Your comments about investing will be refuted when inaccurate, so potential 403b clients will be educated.

 

I for one welcome and look forward to your posts. You are definately not "wasting your time".

 

Thank you very much.

 

 

P.S. T.R and the others who Steve mentioned are advocates for the "SALES" agent, but please notice the derth of their posts. They were not able to compete in an open forum of educated people who have the best interest of the 403b participant.

 

 

You never welcomed me to the board.

 

 

 

 

He's baaaaaaack. And as usual, he has contempt for anybody other than self-styled experts who may know something about investing. Just leave eeeeeeverything to those sales advisors, and they will take care of us.

 

 

OK. You're an expert too.

 

But TR, I'm not NEARLY the expert that dreyes111 is. He guarantees that he can beat any mutual fund in existence with his innovative money management system and a simple fixed annuity. He is an absolute miracle worker. That silly old rule about risk and return has just vanished.

 

Can you top that, TR?

 

 

Things are a bit slow, eh?

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On mutual funds where rate of return is not guaranteed, pay more attention to negative years.

 

-40% followed by +60% does NOT equal +20% net, 10% average. FALSE, FALSE, FALSE

 

Take $100. lose 40%, or $40.

now $60. gain 60%, or $36

now $96, net for two years of -4%, avg -2%.

 

To get the average, one would multiply (1 (+/- performance)/100) for each year, subtract 1, divide by number of years. From the above example.

 

(((1-.40)*(1+.60)) -1)/ 2 =( (.60 * 1.60)-1) /2 = (.96 - 1) / 2 = -.04 / 2= -.02

 

When a fund shows a long term average performance, there might be a standard for how they show this, but I'm not sure. There's liars, damn liars, and statisticians.

 

IMHO, the funds with the fewest negative years are actually doing the best. Its also reflected in the long term averages. Negative years really mess up long term performance.

 

Different funds within companies have different performance, the risk is available to view. Some managers are better than others, even within companies.

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TR, you said, "You never welcomed me to the board" It's true I did not welcome you to the board , but you joined the board before I did. Eventhough your facts are not correct, I want to take this oportunity to welcome you to the board.

 

I am hopeful that you will post along with dreyes111.

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On mutual funds where rate of return is not guaranteed, pay more attention to negative years.

 

-40% followed by +60% does NOT equal +20% net, 10% average. FALSE, FALSE, FALSE

 

Take $100. lose 40%, or $40.

now $60. gain 60%, or $36

now $96, net for two years of -4%, avg -2%.

 

To get the average, one would multiply (1 (+/- performance)/100) for each year, subtract 1, divide by number of years. From the above example.

 

(((1-.40)*(1+.60)) -1)/ 2 =( (.60 * 1.60)-1) /2 = (.96 - 1) / 2 = -.04 / 2= -.02

 

When a fund shows a long term average performance, there might be a standard for how they show this, but I'm not sure. There's liars, damn liars, and statisticians.

 

IMHO, the funds with the fewest negative years are actually doing the best. Its also reflected in the long term averages. Negative years really mess up long term performance.

 

Different funds within companies have different performance, the risk is available to view. Some managers are better than others, even within companies.

 

 

LJ,

 

That was a good reminder about the damage that can come from negative years. We should all be mindful of this, as well as our perceived tolerance for riding out the bad times. I would only add that during down years, a long term investor should continue to invest on a regular basis in order to pick up shares at low prices. Dollar cost averaging is a good way to ride out the highs and lows of the markets.

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