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MoeMoney

I wrote a blog post: why I resigned.

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I’m stepping out of my comfort zone.Enough. Why I Decided to resign.

It’s far from perfect and I’m not a master but it’s a start and a work in progress. I have way more to learn still but time waits for no one!

Thanks for enlightening me in many ways.

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Why were you surprised that your decision to quit caught them off guard?

If I were them, I would have predicted that you’d stay put (possibly finding a way to earn the other half credit through sub-ing or whatever) for two reasons:

1. You love the work and want to continue working even after having quit.

2. It would have doubled your pension, which is of course equivalent to earning a massive sum of money.

The blog kind of reads like there may be some unstated reasons for being unhappy. 

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2) I recognize it’s walking away from “a massive amount of money” and most people would not do that, therefore they were surprised that I did. The golden handcuffs. I suppose that should not surprise me.

But the employer changed the terms of employment so would they not consider the employee would choose not to accept it? That is what surprised me. I know it all comes down to the same thing - finances. But there comes a day, or a dollar amount saved, that makes someone realize they have enough. (Or reach a magic number of years, or a certain age, or should have enough.) Some people don’t know what enough is so they are afraid to walk away. Some people do, and walk away no matter what’s still on the table.

1) Loving  what I  do also means I can do it anywhere else. Some people wouldn’t do that but some would embrace the opportunity. It surprises and saddens me to think that employers have, or think they have, so much control and that employees feel they have no control (or responsibility) over their life or career decisions. 

Here’s the tie-in to this forum - if I hadn’t taken control of my deferred compensation plans and learned how to do that here (thereby taking responsibility of my money/future).  I’d have to accept their terms.

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Moe

I ran into this article right after reading your post.  I still think in an ideal situation teachers have it pretty good but the leadership is not where it should be and there is so much bias toward academic learning over CTE learning which might not be appropriate for a growing number of students.. I have found so many of my past administrators lacking in employee management skills. I think most folks in education that are in leadership roles need to be made to take intensive human /employee management skills. They also need to spend more time in classrooms. Some don't have a clue.

 

 "Still, that only chips away at part of the problem. As for the rest of it, well, we've clearly got some work to do. https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/teacher-shares-why-she-just-120000511.html

 

In Virginia, if you quit, you can usually retrieve a current cash value of your pension based on past contributions. Do you have that option?

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32 minutes ago, MoeMoney said:

But the employer changed the terms of employment so would they not consider the employee would choose not to accept it?

That should certainly create uncertainty on their end, but such is the nature of predictions.

34 minutes ago, MoeMoney said:

It surprises and saddens me to think that employers have, or think they have, so much control 

For most professions, the employer absolutely has immense control.

To add to that general topic, I’ve argued (to companies) that making certain changes to directly benefit employees would provide an indirect, but significant benefit to the company. They disagreed because they viewed everything as a zero sum game; if the employee benefits, it can only be at the expense of the company. Naturally they came to view me as their opposition.

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Yes 

I apologize if I caused confusion Ed. I read Moe's resignation comment and soon after ran into this teacher's facebook post from my school system that also resigned on Yahoo news. I did not know at the time how close to home this teacher actually was LOL! Both resignations were similar( somewhat) in sentiment. The local paper  here picked up on her facebook post which has gone viral throughout the country which struck a nerve. I admire the candor she expressed in  teacher frustration. And she is not wrong unfortunately. The 403b arena is only one area that needs improvement in Education. Other obstacles seem just as insurmountable unfortunately.

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I suspect I’ll hold the minority opinion here, I didn’t find the 5 listed arguments to be particularly persuasive:

1. This argument is as old as time and I’m tired of hearing it. Every generation gets labeled as inferior to the last, yet somehow when you look through the volatility, civilization manages to improve rather than regress. In this case, I guess she is arguing that this generation of parents/society is getting it all wrong relative to older generations. I’m not buying it.

2. She didn’t even provide evidence that relationship building is hindered by preferring teachers with a basic understanding of technology or giving children one to one access to technology. She just states it as fact, a fact that I suspect isn’t actually true. The access I had to technology as a student changed my life and prepared me for my career as a Software Engineer.

3. She seems to be arguing that training diminishes quality instruction rather than adding to. Obviously that isn’t generally true. It would be reasonable to ask for better training or the ability to “test out” of training that is beneath you, but to argue that training hurts quality instruction conflicts with every experience I’ve ever had with training/education. It’s an investment that generally pays off because you’re able to stand on the knowledge and experience of so many people who are probably smarter than you.

4. I have no idea how she proposes we hold parents accountable. While I sympathize with the annoyances that the general public (in this case parents) can often provide...that’s part of the job of a teacher.

5. It isn’t clear what she needed for the kids that was being withheld. I guess dealing with all of the sad aspects of society (poverty, disability, etc) and seeing that show up in children had a negative affect on her mental state, which then affected her physical state. That’s fine, I sympathize. There are lots of jobs I’m not emotionally capable of holding, but it is because of who I am, not a defect in the job. 

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Ed, unless you have actually taught over time in a K-12 classroom., it would be very difficult for you to  accurately ascertain what it's like today to teach and the changes that are occurring because of technology overuse, bad parenting,  poverty, and bad student behavior . Also , the issues mentioned may be more prominent and /or specific  to certain school environments and communities than others. Now that I know where she taught, same place I also taught, I get where she is coming from.  It could very well be though that she simply did not have the temperament to be a teacher in the first place but I do know my past school system presented and still presents some serious challenges.

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Hello all,

I have been in "decompression" mode, hence my delayed response. 

My sentiment was more that I had enough (enough personal resources and enough of the bureaucracy) and I chose not to elaborate on the inefficiencies of the educational system.  Instead the point was more or less I was able to choose to accept a reduction or go on to do something else. Believe me, it took lots of percolating and discussion but at the end of the day, I am free to move on, untethered and ready to create another opportunity. 

It is worthy of pointing out that a major tenet behind the FI movement is to build up personal resources so that you can have choices, if and when the all-powerful employer makes changes or you want to make changes in your location or lifestyle. For some people that comes naturally but for others, it never occurs to set yourself up for that. 

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