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tony

The Bad Things About Early Retirement Nobody Talks About

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Personally, I can't imagine anyone missing  work in any profession unless it was stress free and full of perks. As a retired educator, all I can say is my blood pressure is way down  now and I'm 12 pounds thinner too. I don't miss the stress and my doctor telling me I need to be on anti -deppressent which I refused  And i don't have an identity crisis. But we are all different.

https://www.marketwatch.com/story/these-are-the-bad-things-about-early-retirement-that-no-one-talks-about-2018-09-26?siteid=yhoof2&yptr=yahoo

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The author claims:

1. Identity crisis.

2. Lack of productivity leading to doubt, depression, and negativity.

3. People won’t like you because you’re retired.

4. You won’t be as happy as you think (or happy at all) and then you’ll beat yourself up.

5. With nothing to do, you’ll question the point and hollowness of life. 

I feel like 1, 2, and 5 are all the same point. We really have conditioned society into becoming human machines that find joy in maximizing productivity for their employers. It’s like Stockholm Syndrome, just wild. 

I think 3 just saves you time from dealing with folks you’re better off avoiding.

4 is interesting because of course you adjust to happiness, but a lot of people struggle to adjust to their soul sucking jobs. The choice seems obvious.

 

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5 hours ago, EdLaFave said:

We really have conditioned society into becoming human machines that find joy in maximizing productivity for their employers. It’s like Stockholm Syndrome, just wild. 

 

I think Americans definitely suffer from this syndrome. They definitely form an irrational bond with their jobs.We probably spend more time working than any other industrialized nation. And we don't complain much but maybe a little more than we used to.. Problem is no-one on their death bed will wonder if they spent enough time working. I don't miss it.  I enjoy reading your commentary.

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55 minutes ago, tony said:

Americans definitely suffer from this syndrome. They definitely form an irrational bond with their jobs.We probably spend more time working than any other industrialized nation

I don’t entirely share this quality, but I can fully understand the basic human desire to do and accomplish things. What fascinates me is that so many people choose to direct this energy towards their employer’s goals and interests rather than their own.

55 minutes ago, tony said:

we don't complain much but maybe a little more than we used to

There’s a pretty big difference between my little Millennial bubble, which is overpopulated with software engineers, and my perception of the general population.

In my bubble there is a significant minority (40% maybe) of people who believe:

1. Corporations are amoral at best and immoral at worst.

2. The short term profit motive combined with #1 cultivates a culture where employees are objects standing in the way of additional profit.

3. The economy is structured against workers and it’s only going to get worse.

These folks tend to complain loudly and have no problem envisioning and planning for their lives post-FIRE.

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